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Morgan County School District
Morgan County Curriculum 4.1 High School
Science - Integrated Science

Physical Science (25%)

1.1.1 (DOK 2) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to classify or make generalizations about elements from data of observed patterns in atomic structure and/or position on the periodic table. (The periodic table is a consequence of the repeating pattern of outermost electrons.).
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Structure and Transformation of Matter   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) STM U-1, S-1 Classroom
  
1.1.2 (DOK) Supporting
The learner will be able to understand that the atom's nucleus is composed of protons and neutrons that are much more massive than electrons; When an element has atoms that differ in the number of neutrons, these atoms are called different isotopes of the element.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Structure and Transformation of Matter   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) STM U-1, S-1 Classroom
  
1.1.3 (DOK) Supporting
The learner will be able to understand that solids, liquids, and gases differ in the distances between molecules or atoms and therefore the energy that binds them together. In solids, the structure is nearly rigid; in liquids, molecules or atoms move around each other but do not move apart; and in gases, molecules or atoms move almost independently of each other and are relatively far apart.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Structure and Transformation of Matter   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) STM U-1, S-9 Classroom
  
1.1.4 (DOK) Supporting
The learner will be able to understand that in conducting materials, electrons flow easily; whereas, in insulating materials, they can hardly flow at all. Semiconducting materials have intermediate behavior. At low temperatures, some materials become superconductors and offer no resistance to the flow of electrons.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Structure and Transformation of Matter   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) Classroom
  
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Earth/Space Science (16%)

2.3.1 (DOK 3) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to explain phenomena (falling objects, planetary motion, satellite motion) related to gravity; Describe the factors that affect gravitational force. (Gravity is a universal force that each mass exerts on every other mass.).
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
The Earth and the Universe   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) Classroom
  
2.3.2 (DOK 2) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to describe the current scientific theory of the formation of the universe (Big Bang) and its evidence; Explain the role of gravity in the formation of the universe and its components. (The big bang theory and observational measurements that support it place the origin of the universe at a time between 10 and 20 billion years ago, when the universe began in a hot dense state. According to this theory, the universe has been expanding since then. Early in the history of the universe, the first atoms to form were mainly hydrogen and helium. Over time, these elements clump together by gravitational attraction to form trillions of stars.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
The Earth and the Universe   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) EU U-1, S-4 Classroom
  
2.3.3 (DOK 2) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to explain the origin of the heavy elements in planetary objects (planets, stars). (Some stars explode at the end of their lives, and the heavy elements they have created are blasted out into space to form the next generation of stars and planets.).
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
The Earth and the Universe   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) Classroom
  
2.3.4 (DOK) Supporting
The learner will be able to understand that stars have life cycles of birth through death that are analogous to those of living organisms. During their lifetimes, stars generate energy from nuclear fusion reactions that create successively heavier chemical elements.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
The Earth and the Universe   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) Classroom
  
2.3.5 (DOK 2) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to explain the difference between alpha and beta decay, fission, and fusion; Identify the relationship between nuclear reactions and energy. (Nuclear reactions convert a fraction of the mass of interacting particles into energy, and they can release much greater amounts of energy than atomic interactions. Fission (alpha and beta decay) is the splitting of a large nucleus into smaller pieces. Fusion is the joining of two nuclei at extremely high temperature and pressure. Fusion is the process responsible for the energy of the Sun and other stars.).
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
The Earth and the Universe   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) Classroom
  
2.3.6 (DOK) Supporting
The learner will be able to understand that the forces that hold the nucleus together, at nuclear distances, are usually stronger than the forces that would make it fly apart.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
The Earth and the Universe   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) Classroom
  
2.3.7 (DOK) Supporting
The learner will be able to understand that the Sun, Earth, and the rest of the solar system formed approximately 4.6 billion years ago from a nebular cloud of dust and gas.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
The Earth and the Universe   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) Classroom
  
2.3.8 (DOK 3) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to compare the limitations/benefits of various techniques (radioactive dating, observing rock sequences, and comparing fossils) for estimating geological; Justify deductions about age of geologic features. (Techniques used to estimate geological time include using radioactive dating, observing rock sequences, and comparing fossils to correlate the rock sequences at various locations.).
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
The Earth and the Universe   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) Classroom
  
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Unifying Ideas (34%)

4.6.1 (DOK 3) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to explain the relationships and connections between matter, energy, living systems, and the physical environment; Give examples of conservation of matter and energy. (As matter and energy flow through different organizational levels (e.g., cells, organs, organisms, communities) and between living systems and the physical environment, chemical elements are recombined in different ways. Each recombination results in storage and dissipation of energy into the environment as heat. Matter and energy are conserved in each change.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Energy Transformations   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) ET U-1, S-9 Classroom
  
4.6.2 (DOK 3)
The learner will be able to predict wave behavior and energy transfer: Apply knowledge of waves to real life phenomena/investigations. (Waves, including sound and seismic waves, waves on water, and electromagnetic waves, can transfer energy when they interact with matter. Apparent changes in frequency can provide information about relative motion.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Energy Transformations   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006)Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) ET U-3, S4 Classroom
  
4.6.3 (DOK) Supporting
The learner will be able to understand that electromagnetic waves, including radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, x-rays, and gamma rays, result when a charged object is accelerated.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Energy Transformations   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) ET S-4 Classroom
  
4.6.4 (DOK 3) Assessed
The learner will be able to describe the components and reservoirs involved in biogeochemical cycles (water, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen); Explain the movement of matter and energy in biogeochemical cycles and related phenomena. (The total energy of the universe is constant. Energy can change forms and/or be transferred in many ways, but it can neither be created nor destroyed. Movement of matter between reservoirs is driven by Earth's internal and external sources of energy. These movements are often accompanied by a change in physical and chemical properties o f the matter. Carbon, for example, occurs in carbonate rocks such as limestone, in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide gas, in water as dissolved carbon dioxide, an in all organisms as complex molecules that control the chemistry of life.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Energy Transformations   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) ET U-4, S-3, S-5 Classroom
  
4.6.6 (DOK) Supporting
The learner will be able to understand that heat is the manifestation of the random motion and vibrations of atoms.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Energy Transformations   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) Classroom
  
4.6.7 (DOK 2) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to explain real world applications of energy using information/data; Evaluate explanations of mechanical systems using current scientific knowledge about energy. (The universe becomes less orderly and less organized over time. Thus, the overall effect is that the energy is spread out uniformly. For example, in the operation of mechanical systems, the useful energy output is always less than the energy input; the difference appears as heat.).
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Energy Transformations   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) Classroom
  
4.6.8 (DOK 3) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to describe the connections between the functioning of the Earth system and its sources of energy (internal and external); Predict the consequences of changes to any component of the Earth system. (Earth systems have sources of energy that are internal and external to the Earth. The Sun is the major external source of energy. Two primary sources of internal energy are the decay of radioactive isotopes and the gravitational energy from Earth's original formation.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Energy Transformations   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) ET U-10, S-10, S-11 Classroom
  
4.6.9 (DOK 3) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to explain the cause and effect relationship between global climate and weather patterns and energy transfer (cloud cover, location of mountain ranges, oceans); Predict the consequences of changes to the global climate and weather patterns. (Global climate is determined by energy transfer from the Sun at and near Earth's surface. This energy transfer is influenced by dynamic processes such as cloud cover and the Earth's rotation and static conditions such as the position of mountain ranges and oceans.).
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Energy Transformations   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) ET U-11, S-12, S-13 Classroom
  
4.7.2 (DOK 3) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to evaluate proposed solutions from multiple perspectives to environmental problems caused by human interaction; Justify positions using evidence/data. (Human beings live within the world's ecosystems. Human activities can deliberately or inadvertently alter the dynamics in ecosystems. These activities can threaten current and future global stability and, if not addressed, stability can be irreversibly affected.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Interdependence   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) I U-1, U-2, S-1, S-5, S-7 Classroom
  
4.7.3 (DOK 3) ASSESSED
The learner will be able to predict the consequences of changes to any component (atmosphere, solid Earth, oceans, living things) of the Earth System; Propose justifiable solutions to global problems. (Interactions among the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere, and living things have resulted in the atmosphere, and living things have resulted in the ongoing development of a changing Earth system.).
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Interdependence   Master 1.0 Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Version 4.1); Kentucky Program of Studies (2006) I U-3, S-3 Classroom
  
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